headerlogo

Clarinet Quintet

for clarinet and string quartet, by Anthony Ritchie Opus 124

Clarinet Quintet

A substantial work in 3 movements - a lively and energetic first movement - a brooding slow movement - and a restless uneasy finale.

Programme Note

In the last five years Anthony Ritchie has focused much of his creative energies on chamber music. Piano Trio composed in 2001 indicated a new direction, with use of 12-note rows and generally a freer approach to all musical parameters. The trio was followed by String Quartet No.2 (2003), Oppositions for Piano Quartet (2004), Rites of Passage, for bassoon and string quintet (2005), and now the Clarinet Quintet. A CD of Ritchie's chamber music has just been released by Kiwi Pacific Records, including the trio and piano quartet, along with sonatas for cello and viola from the 1990s.

Clarinet Quintet was commissioned by Christopher Marshall for his chamber music series "Christopher's Classics" in 2006. It was written for Gretchen Dunsmore, clarinet, and The New Zealand String Quartet, for a premiere performance on September 13, 2006. The composition was also written as part of the composer's work at The University of Otago.

The point of departure in this work is Mozart, in the year of his 250th anniversary. Motivic ideas are derived from the opening melody of his Clarinet Quintet, using a magic square to transform the pitches. No direct reference is made to the Mozart theme until the third movement, which is more diatonic in character.

The first movement begins mysteriously, with a clarinet solo interspersed with rustlings from the strings. This solo contains the seeds for the entire movement, which is fast, lively and angular, following the slow introduction. A more moody and edgy middle section gradually builds up to a climax near the end of this movement. Contrasting with this is a slow middle movement that opens with a simple and bold statement on the strings. Over the top of this the clarinet plays a lamenting melody. The first four notes are a quotation from the composer's opera The God Boy (Mrs Sullivan's motif) signifying anxiety and guilt. A slightly calmer middle section is free in tonality, and builds up strongly in intensity, followed by an abridged return to the opening.

The finale is a 'moto perpetuo' movement in which the diatonic opening idea is undermined by subtle tensions in the music. Although it is fast-paced and lively, it is also weary and uneasy in tone. A rousing final section leads to a quiet, fading coda, as the life in the music is gradually exhausted. Dedicated to Mozart

Buy the right to download a single pdf score, including all parts, online, and permission to duplicate or print it as required for one quintet: NZ$50.00

Orders are processed once per hour. A link to your file should arrive by email within 60 minutes of ordering. If it does not, please send an email to bellbirdpublications at gmail dot com